Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Clock in Cambridge, England known as the Chronophage.  The clock speeds up and slows down and is only exact to the second every fifteen minutes.  The lights are from a continuous LED disc and the second and minute is show using vernier sights.  It’s big, gold, and gorgeous.

Clock in Cambridge, England known as the Chronophage.  The clock speeds up and slows down and is only exact to the second every fifteen minutes.  The lights are from a continuous LED disc and the second and minute is show using vernier sights.  It’s big, gold, and gorgeous.

Reblogged from merlin  410 notes

Maybe everybody else knows this, but what is the difference between the pager and the email? By

Chief justice John Roberts (via maxistentialist)

What.

(via merlin)

The Supreme Court has its share of technology ignorance and Chief Roberts is a total fuckface, but this is unfair. We need a new kind of snopes for out of context meme-quotes that just won’t die. Leaving aside the fact that SC justices always ask naive questions to get answers on the public record, Roberts was actually asking a reasonable question about how police policy treats email messages and pager messages.

Let’s broaden the view:

JUSTICE GINSBURG: Wouldn’t that employee expect that the policy would carry over to pagers? I mean, would — when you think of what’s the reason why they want to look at the e-mails, wouldn’t the same reason apply?

MR. DAMMEIER: Well, I’m sure the same reasons could apply, but the — the city is the one that writes the rules here. The — if they want to make it clear on what it applies to, it certainly should be on them to write them clear so the employee understands.

CHIEF JUSTICE ROBERTS: Maybe — maybe everybody else knows this, but what is the difference between the pager and the e-mail?

MR. DAMMEIER: Sure. The e-mail, looking at the computer policy, that goes through the city’s computer, it goes through the city’s server, it goes through all the equipment that — that has — that the city can easily monitor. Here the pagers are a separate device that goes home with you, that travels with you, that you can use on duty, off-duty.

CHIEF JUSTICE ROBERTS: You can do that with e-mails.

MR. DAMMEIER: Certainly, certainly. But in this instance with the pagers it went through no city equipment, it went through Arch Wireless and then was transmitted to another — another person.

Gee, I wonder why the Supreme Court is so slow to livestream their proceedings. Can you even imagine how many hundreds of thousands of reblogs an animated gif of Roberts asking this question would get?


Turns OUT! Thanks for the correction, my friend. Nice catch.

(via merlin)

Thank you for doing the leg work that proves that we are technically lazy vs. the Supreme Court who we perceive to be technically lazy.